How to Use a Tailor's Clapper and Point Presser in Sewing

How to Use a Tailor's Clapper and Point Presser in Sewing

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Learn how to use a tailor's clapper or sewing clapper, and learn a bit about point pressers in sewing. These fantastic tools will make sewing projects so much easier!

If you've never used a proper aid when ironing seams in your projects, now is the time to start. Getting crisp seams is as simple as using the proper tools while you're ironing! The point presser will also offer life-changing results. Get at those hard to reach areas quickly and easily using the two different points on the point presser.

Learn more about these fantastic tools below and get excited for how much easier it will be to make your sewing projects look professional!

The Tailor's Clapper

The tailor's clapper is a must for sewing and ironing. It is used to press seams without burning. I discovered the clapper when I was taking a sewing class on making jeans and wondered how I ever sewed without it. Now, I use it on everything I make.

Used with steam from your iron, press the area with the clapper and hold for just a few seconds, it will leave a nice crisp seam.

Larger Clapper weighs about 1.2 lbs and measures 11 ½” inches long, 3” wide tapered down to 2 1/2 inches and is 1 1/2” thick.

Medium Clapper weighs 12oz, & measure 9 1/2" long, 2 1/2" wide tapering down to 2". 

Smaller clapper weighs 6 oz, and measure 8" long 2" wide tapered down to 1 1/2" and is 1 1/2" thick.

Both sides have routed grooves to offer easy handling and is unfinished to absorb the steam better.

Point Presser

This is three tools in one!

First it is one of our great tailor's clappers but it has the added benefits of a long pointed point presser for those hard to reach seams and enclosed corners like on collars, lapels and cuffs and it also has a shorter point press for other hard to reach areas.

The point pressers are used by slipping the seam, wrong side up, over the desired point and press open. Apply steam to the area with your iron and press and hold for a few seconds to create a perfect crisp edge.

The bottom of the clapper is used to apply pressure to set permanent creases to form crisp edges, and flatten bulky seams.

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Have you ever used a tailor's clapper or point presser? Will you start?

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No I have not.Probably never will only cause I don't sew.

I have not used a tailors clappers or a pressure point. I will start using them if I win them.

These are tools I remember my mom and my aunt, both great seamstresses,using to create wonderful outfits for the family!

I have used a flat clapperand loved it yes I would use this all of the time if I had one

Never had any to use and maybe if I win these, I will be able to try it. I hear they are wonderful tools.

No, but what a handy tool to have use!

I remember seeing my grandmother use something similar to this when she quilted. I would love to win one.

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