Craft Tutorials and How Tos You Might Have Missed: Part 2

Best Yarn for Blankets

Hey guys! As you may remember, in part 1 of “Craft Tutorials and How Tos You Might Have Missed” we helped introduce you to some easy DIY craft ideas for the home. Well, good news-a similar list is back again! These free and simple crafting tips will help make your DIY adventures magical and are helpful to any and all skill-levels. Although you may think that you are doing crafting the easy way, these home craft tutorials will help you avoid common mistakes that every crafter makes.

Learn how to find multiple crafting uses with an old toothbrush with 17 Crafty Uses for an Old Toothbrush and discover which crafting materials are best for your specific project in Mod Podge vs. Glue. If you want to jazz up your wardrobe with tie-dyed t-shirts but don’t want to spend a lot of money then try this beginner-level craft technique Crumple Tie-Dye Technique.

Mod Podge vs. Glue

Any crafter loves a good DIY organizing project and with Pill Bottle Crafts: Reuse Pill Bottles with this Crafty Guide you can learn how to create DIY storage the affordable way! If knitting or crocheting is more your speed, find out what the best yarns are for that DIY afghan with Best Yarn for Blankets.

Pill Bottle Crafts

Even if you are an experienced crafter, having access to free crafting tutorials can never hurt! These simple craft how tos will teach you how to create unique, beautiful pieces for your home without the added stress and expense. Make crafting fun and relaxing again by using this helpful list as a crafting resource for you and your friends! The best way to learn about helpful crafting techniques is by sharing with those around us. So what are you waiting for? Start reading part 2 for priceless crafting insight!

Our Newest Craft Tutorials:

1. Mod Podge vs. Glue
2. Lessons Learned from My First Shibori Dyeing Experience
3. 17 Crafty Uses for an Old Toothbrush
4. Recycled Flower Pots: 29 Water Bottle Planters and More DIY Planter Pots
5. Crumple Tie-Dye Technique
6. Pill Bottle Crafts: Reuse Pill Bottles with this Crafty Guide
7. Best Yarn for Blankets
8. Upcycle Your Old Household Items into Crafts
9. What Is Shibori Tie Dye?
10. How to Choose the Best Craft Glue
11. What Are the Best Knitting Needles for Beginners?
12. How to Wash Craft Felt

Don’t forget to sign up for the FaveCrafts newsletter, Quick and Crafty, for daily crafts and tips delivered straight to your inbox.

“What is your best advice for new crafters?”

How to Make Paper Snowflakes

Making paper snowflakes has always been one of my favorite winter activities, but I was absolutely obsessed with paper snowflakes as a child. When I first learned how to make a paper snowflake, I just couldn’t stop. My kitchen table has been no stranger to paper scraps and multicolored scissors over the years, and now that winter is finally here, I had to share my love for these snowy paper creations.

This kid-friendly guide will teach you everything you need to know, from learning how to make paper snowflakes to tackling tricky paper snowflake designs. Just because these winter crafts are perfect for kids doesn’t mean adults can’t make them, too. Making paper snowflakes has no age limit!

Start with the Basics

This paper snowflake tutorial from FaveCrafts will teach you the basic paper snowflake pattern, so start here!

  1. Fold a square piece of paper in half diagonally to form a triangle.
  2. Fold in half again.
  3. Fold the triangle into thirds, folding each side towards the center.
  4. Cut a straight line across the bottom.
  5. Cut pieces out of all three sides in random patterns.
  6. Open to see your finished snowflake.

Once you’ve mastered these six steps, you can move on to the paper snowflake patterns below!

Paper Snowflake Patterns

One of a Kind Snowflakes– this paper snowflake pattern will help inspire you to create your own wintery creations.

Pipe Cleaner and Paper Snowflakes -if younger family member struggle with scissors, you can make these paper snowflakes instead! They’re just as cute, and they’re incredibly easy.

Super-Sized Snowflakes -making paper snowflakes is always fun, but making them as big as you is even better! These gargantuan flakes are easy to make, too.

Paper Snowflake Garland -this tutorial from Elevator Musik will teach you how to make paper snowflakes into a festive DIY garland.

More Amazing Paper Snowflake Designs

3D Paper Snowflakes -once you’ve mastered the standard paper snowflake template, go the extra mile and try making them 3D!

Game of Thrones Paper Snowflake Patterns -Krystal Higgins designed these awesome paper snowflake patterns, and you can download the templates for free to make your own!

Precious Snowflake Lions -turn your favorite snowflakes into adorable wintery creatures!

Paper Snowflake Trees– these creative paper crafts from Just Crafty Enough are the perfect way to reinvent your classic paper snowflake designs and make an elegant centerpiece all in one project.

Star Wars Paper Snowflake Patterns– make these paper snowflake designs from Anthony Herrera to prove you are the ultimate Star Wars fan. Browse the site for even more amazing patterns!

 Psssssst! Have a unique paper snowflake tutorial you’d like to share? Contact us!

Do you and your family make paper snowflakes in the winter?

How to Organize Beads: What Are Your Best Tips and Tricks?

Veteran beaders know best: If you want to be successful in the art of beading (and maintain your sanity while doing it), you’ve got to keep your bead stash organized. As you start to create your own jewelry, you’ll begin collecting more and more beads. Before you know it, your bead stash has gotten out of control!

Keeping your beads organized can help save space, time (“Now where did I put those crystals?”), and money (“Whoops, I already bought these briolettes!”). It can be quite a task keeping all those tiny beads, findings, and other assorted bits and baubles in order, especially once you become a full-fledged “bead hoarder.” So it’s best to develop good organization habits early on.

All beaders have their own special tips and tricks they’ve picked up over the years, from the best containers to use, to categorization systems by color and type. So why not share them and help out a fellow beader? Pass on your wisdom and experience to your fellow jewelry-making enthusiasts by leaving a comment on this blog post with your best bead storage tips! Then, we’ll pull all your awesome suggestions together into a handy tip guide for AllFreeJewelryMaking.com so other beaders can benefit from your wisdom!

So, what are your best tips and tricks for storing and organizing beads?

Leave a comment below and share your suggestions!

 

 

Help a Reader: Marketing

Every now and then, everyone could use a helping hand. Ready to lend your assistance? Below you’ll find a few readers in need. If you feel you can help or have any suggestions, please post your answer in the comments. Please try to supply instructions and/or links.

Casey asks,

“People LOVE the concept of my environmental workshops, but they’re surprised to learn there’s a fee involved in booking them! What am I doing wrong in marketing my business?”

 

Your answers could appear in an upcoming Creative Income newsletter – subscribe today!

Help A Reader: Pricing

Every now and then, everyone could use a helping hand. Ready to lend your assistance? Below you’ll find a few readers in need. If you feel you can help or have any suggestions, please post your answer in the comments. Please try to supply instructions and/or links.

Gypsy asks,

“I found the formula to use to figure out what to charge for my crafts. But I could not find what rate to figure my labor cost as. The formula is Cost of Goods + Labor X Overhead. So, if it takes me 7 hours to make something, what do I charge for labor?”

 

 

Your answers could appear in an upcoming Creative Income newsletter – subscribe today!

Help A Reader: Trade Shows

Every now and then, everyone could use a helping hand.  Ready to lend your assistance?   Below you’ll find a few readers in need.  If you feel you can help or have any suggestions, please post your answer in the comments. Please try to supply instructions and/or links.

 

Pat asks,
“Regarding trade shows, how do we identify and locate them and determine what would germane to our craft?”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your answers could appear in an upcoming Creative Income newsletter – subscribe today!

 

5 Steps To Starting a Free Craft Blog

You love to craft and want to share your projects with the world. Why not start a craft blog? It’s super simple to start blogging about your craft with these five easy steps.

  1. Pick a service to use.
    There are many free blogging services like Blogger, WordPress, and Yola. They are all relatively simple to use and offer lots of free features like the ability to customize your blog. All of these services allow users to choose a premade layout design, so there is no need to learn code or design your own blog. Each of the services offer different features, so look at each one or ask a blogging friend what they use before you get started.
  2. Create a Banner Header.

    You will need to create a header to show off your cool new blog and you can do it yourself. You can use Picnik, Picasa or Gimp which are all free to create your new title header.
  3. Create content for your blog.
    This is the most important part of the whole blogging experience. Good content is what attracts and keeps readers. Make sure that you are writing about what you are passionate about and want to continue writing about. If your blog is a mish mosh of your life which includes craft, cooking, parenting, farming, etc. then make sure you let your readers know that either in your title or your description. Sometimes bloggers mix in parts of their life alongside their main focus which is great but if you start a blog called All About Felt and suddenly talk about nothing but milking cows, you will inevitably lose readers. So, keep to what you know and let your readers know what to expect in an About Me or Description Page.
  4. Tell people about your blog.
    There is one way to make sure people know you started a blog, tell them. Once you have a couple of posts under your belt, let the world know it. If you use any social media sites like Facebook or Twitter, post all about it. Make sure you let the world know it is your new blog and what the topic is. This increases your chances of people visiting your blog and clicking on the links you add to the social media networks. To make social media even simpler, you can set up an account in TwitterFeed that will create a tweet or facebook update every time you post to your blog. You can also add your blog address to your email signature so that your emails will also be promoting for you.
  5. Work at your blog.
    My buddy Jenny likes to say that people need to “rock their baby” when it comes to making their blogs a success and that just means they need love and attention from the blogger. In order to make a blog successful, the first step is to make consistently good content. Which means once you get started blogging, don’t stop. Keep that momentum going and write about what you know and love. Share your projects, tips, and techniques. Posts don’t have to be full tutorials every time, they can be about sharing your inspirations, favorite products, or even a cool new trick. The important part is to keep on blogging once you start.

Welcome to the wonderful world of blogging. It can be a wonderful way to make friends and share what you love. For more ideas for help with your crafty business, subscribe to the Creative Income Newsletter, which is chock full of ideas for bloggers, designers, and all kinds of crafters. If you are considering starting a craft business, Creative Income and our great articles about the business of craft is a great place to start.


Already have a crafty blog? Share your tips and tricks with our readers as well as your link in the comments!

Help a Reader: Revamp a Lamp

Every now and then, everyone could use a helping hand.  Ready to lend your assistance?   Below you’ll find a few readers in need.  If you feel you can help or have any suggestions, please post your answer in the comments. Please try to supply instructions and/or links.

Arlene asks,
I have a lamp shade that has the spines on a curve, and I would like to
recover it. I believe it should be done on the bias, but I am unable to do
it. Any suggestions?

Lety asks,
I was offered to teach a 2 hour crochet for beginners class once a week, but I don’t know how to start it. Any suggestions on how to break the ice? By the way, I’m 35 years old and the majority of my students are older, Spanish speaking, and they think they know it all! That intimidates me a little!

Help a Reader: Tunisian Patterns

Every now and then, everyone could use a helping hand.  Ready to lend your assistance?   Below you’ll find a few readers in need.  If you feel you can help or have any suggestions, please post your answer in the comments. Please try to supply instructions and/or links.

Sandra asks,
I’m looking for a free pattern that I can use with my new circular tunisian needle. I do regular crocheting, but this is my first time using a tunisian needle. Thank you for your help!

Mary Ellen asks,
Do you know anything about the granny square afghan on the T.V. show “Parks and Recreation?” It is a gorgeous throw that many of us crocheters are looking to replicate (the colors are retro and terrific)! Anyone know what yarn was used and/or if there is a pattern/layout for it somewhere? It is the afghan on the back of Ann’s couch. You can see it in this clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D-ih7Xw2VQ0

Michelle asks,
My sister would like me to crochet a baby afghan for a friend of hers to include the baby’s name, birth date, weight, length, etc.  I’m pretty sure I’ve seen patterns that incorporate this information, but I just can’t find them.  Can anyone help me please?  Thanks!

Help a Reader: Identify the Tablecloth

Every now and then, everyone could use a helping hand.  Ready to lend your assistance?   Below you’ll find a few readers in need.  If you feel you can help or have any suggestions, please post your answer in the comments. Please try to supply instructions and/or links.

Linda asks,
I started a pineapple motif circular tablecloth that is 70 inches but before I could finish it, I lost the pattern. Of course it’s been over 10 years since I started it. I have a picture of what I have. Can anyone find the pattern?

Claudia asks,
I see all these beautiful patterns made by people who love crochet like myself. I want to make my own pattern but I’m having trouble drawing a diagram. How do you make a diagram that doesn’t look like a hand drawing? Is there software I can use?

Mickie asks,
There was an abbreviation I never saw before in an old American Thread crochet pattern (1 s d c) but then continued later to use (d c) without the “s”.  What does the “s” signify in this abbreviation?

Ann asks,
I really want to do a ripple stitch afghan/throw in multi-color.  I have tried following a pattern and even a video but i still find it hard. I seem to have either not enough stitches or too many. What can I do?