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Water Bottle Supply Organizer Recycled Craft

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Here are some great ideas for crafts made from recycled items. Use these instructions to make a Water Bottle Supply Organizer Recycled Craft. This is an easy way to organize your crafting supplies with water bottles and other recycled items. Water bottle crafts are a fun way to reuse materials you already have and try new kind of projects at the same time. Often, water bottle crafts are appropriate for all ages, so gather up the kids and have them help you finish this project. If you keep losing pens or other office supplies, this is a great way to get organized. Who knows, you might actually want to sit down and get work done when you have your desk all neat and organized.
 

Water Bottle Supply Organizer Water Bottle Supply Organizer
 

Materials:

  • Plastic lazy susan – mine was 10” at the diameter
  • 13-1/2” disc cut from luan wood
  • Large coffee can
  • 9 – One liter plastic bottles (I used seltzer bottles)
  • 10-3/4” sheet metal screws
  • 20-3/4” nuts
  • 20-3/4” washers
  • Permanent marker
  • Ruler
  • White craft glue (I used Elmers Glue All, but Tacky Glue would be good as well)
  • ½” Flat paint brush
  • Glue stick
  • Printed tissue paper – I used several patterns that I liked – or scrap booking paper
  • Cheese Cloth
  • Acrylic fabric paint (I used burnt umber)
  • X-acto knife with sharp blade
  • Sharp scissors
  • Electric Drill
  • Screwdriver
     

Instructions:

  1. Remove the labels from coffee can and bottles.
     
  2. Wash the can and bottles and allow to dry.
     
  3. Mix some of the paint with enough water to make it the consistency of stain, about 2 parts paint to 3 parts water, and brush onto the best side of the luan wood and allow to dry. Two coats will be good. I used paint to stain the wood only because I don’t like the smell of stain.
     
  4. Decide how tall you would like your bottles to be. I used several heights (6-1/2”, 5”, 4-1/2” and 2-1/2”) that worked well for storing paint brushes, pencils, pens and even a very short one for erasers, rubber bands, etc.
     
  5. Set the bottles on a flat surface and, using a ruler, mark the height that you want each bottle to be. I made several marks, with a permanent marker, around each bottle and ‘connected the dots’ for easy cutting. No alterations will be made to the coffee can.
     
  6. Use the X-acto knife to pierce the bottle and to make a slit above the line you drew, that you can use to start cutting with your scissors.
     
  7. Cut along the line you drew to remove the top of the bottle and throw away the excess plastic.
     
  8. Measure your chosen paper from the very bottom of the bottle to ½” above the cut edge. The extra half inch will be folded over and glued to the inside for a nice finished look. Add an extra ¼” or so to the width so the paper will overlap.
     
  9. When you’ve cut your bottles to the desired size, and measured your paper to fit, coat them, one at a time, with a thick layer of white glue. I used Elmers, but I think Tacky Glue would be as good. Do the same with the coffee can.
     
  10. Lay the paper that you’ve cut face down on a flat surface and position the bottle’s bottom edge at the edge of the paper and roll until the paper completely covers the bottles and can. Add a stripe of glue to the edge and press the extra ¼” of the width down to make a neat seam. Do the same with the coffee can.
     
  11. Press the bottom of the paper into the little indentations around the bottom of the bottle.
     
  12. When all of the bottles and the can are covered, allow them to dry completely.
     
  13. When the bottles and the can are all dry, cut pieces of cheese cloth to fit each bottle, adding ½” to the top and bottom of the height. So the cheese cloth will be 1” longer than the paper that you cut.
     
  14. Again coat the bottles with glue. You don’t need a very heavy coat this time, because cheese cloth won’t absorb the glue. Fold the bottom of the cheese cloth ½” (you may want to use a glue stick to keep the ½” fold in place) and, again, roll the bottle onto the cheese cloth and press in on the indentations at the bottom of each bottle. Glue the inside of the bottle ½” from the top and fold the top ½” of cheese cloth inside the bottle.
     
  15. Cut cheese cloth 1” longer than the area between the top and bottom edges and about ¼” wider than needed for overlap. You won’t have to fold the top ½” over the top edge, but you will want to fold both the top and bottom edges of the cheese cloth to make a neat edge.
     
  16. Allow the bottles and the can to dry completely. Find and mark the exact center of the lazy susan, the coffee can and the wooden disc. Drill through all 3 pieces at the center mark you made on each. Using a ¾” metal screw, and a washer, attach the 3 pieces, turn the project over and using a nut, tighten it down. Make sure the lazy susan still spins freely.
     
  17. Position your bottles close to the outer edge of the wooden disc. Drill a hole through each bottle and another hole through the wooden disc where each bottle will be placed. Put a washer on each screw and insert it through the hole in the bottle and the hole in the disc. Turn the project over and with another washer and a nut, tighten each bottle.
     
  18. When all of the bottles are attached, your supply spinner is ready to use.

 


14 Easy to Make Water Bottle Crafts

You'll be amazed to find out how many awesome crafts you can make out of recycled plastic bottles.  For inspiration and ideas, check out this collection of 14 Easy to Make Water Bottle Crafts. These plastic bottle crafts are creative, unexpected and so fun to make. If you love creating your own jewelry or want to make beautiful home decor items, you'll love this collection of recycled craft ideas. The next time you enjoy a cold drink of water, rest assured that the empty plastic bottle won't go to waste. Environmentally-friendly ideas have never been more fun or exciting.

 


 

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Reviews More Reviews

Jan 29, 2015

Could someone tell me what the cheesecloth is for?

 

Sep 4, 2012

I hot-glued a plastic coffee can in the middle, and then the water bottle bottoms around it, so there were no holes to let water out, and let my daughter use it for her water-color paints. The can in the middle can be used for clean water between colors, and the bottle bottoms keep the paint from splashing and spotting stuff while the brushes are dipped and swished in them.

 

19 Ratings

Oct 19, 2011

Hi Kraftfun, There is no real reason for the cheesecloth. I just liked the texture it gave the bottles. It's a nice look. Thanks, Colleen

 

Sep 4, 2011

Super lindo!!! Muchas gracias por tan genial idea. Besos

 

Jul 8, 2011

I've been re-purposing soda bottles of all sizes, as well as Folder's coffee containers, for years! I've also re-purposed the gallon size containers that Kraft Mayo & Miracle Whip came in a few years back, into an adorable Canister Set! The smaller quart of so sized Mayo containers the ones that are sort of oval-ish shaped? I use those for organising my "JUNK" bin, as well as using them for my previously mountain sized pile of plastic canvas odds, and embroidery thread, as well as they make lovely containers for all those odd screws & nails, that some of us just can't part with! Oh, and another great use for 2 liter or larger Soda Bottles is to add embellishments, and make then into Piggy Banks for the young'ens too! All you need is IMAGINATION!!

 

Jun 16, 2011

How sweetly upcycled & perfect!

 

Jun 14, 2011

What is the use of the cheese cloth?

 

Jun 9, 2011

I am really enjoying my recycle lazy Susan organizers. I added family photos I ran off, then put then around my containers on the lazy Susan. So as I turn it around I can enjoy the photos as I find what I need. Thank you for such a good and useful idea. Susie

 

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